Investment in your viewers (literally): four traffic-driving tools for video

In business, company, corporate video, Guides and Tools, Insight, tips, video, video marketing, video production, Video Tips, viral by danny

A lot of people don’t agree with the concept of traffic-driving tools, yet their rise in popularity has been very hard to ignore. Regularly popping up to the side, at the bottom or slap bang in the middle of articles from BuzzFeed through to the Huffington Post, the big names in this arena are generating major money for the service they provide.

However, it’s easy to understand why they can be annoying. Often, they can be (and still are) used pretty badly. While it’s important to remember that new technology goes hand-in-hand with uninformed users (resulting in articles from a month ago being listed on news sites), it is also spammed by the countless money-thieving ragamuffins who can “shave years off with this one old trick”, using the same image of an old woman peeling her face off to reveal she’s actually 25.

Nonetheless, it’s important to remember that these aggregators, used well, can not only drive real traffic to your site, but effectively build a real viewership for your videos – providing they’re good, of course. Here are our top four picks.

Taboola

This “content discovery platform” puts forward your videos and content through recommendations on decent third-party sites that have signed up to display it. Taboola can put viewers straight through to your site, YouTube, or even Twitter or Facebook.

What’s more, the company also provides you with quite a neat overview of analytics, allowing you to rerun campaigns with a degree of optimisation. With plenty in the way of free resources on site and even live support for subscribers, it’s a good place to start for many video creators.

OneLoad

This is actually quite a clever little website. Serving primarily as an online video distribution service, OneLoad will take your uploaded video and distributed it across 20 video sites including YouTube, Vimeo and even Hulu. If you want to restrict or grow this list, you can customise FTP settings to put it on niche sites of your choice.

OneLoad’s main strength is in its ability to code videos to the right format for each site, and there are few restrictions on file size. Analytics come as standard, and you can stagger launches, add keyword tags, and so on. One to research when you get chance.

Outbrain

Operating on a cost-per-click basis (with a minimum $10-a-day budget), Outbrain can get your content popping up on predominantly US sites such as CNN or ESPN. As you get more traffic and click-throughs, the more Outbrain will recommended it. It’s pretty damn trusted, too – Ford and the New York Times have been known to use it. Just be careful – Outbrain has some of the highest standards on the web, so make sure your videos are suitable.

 

Zemanta

Finally, Zemanta is a good budget alternative to the three suggestions above. It will index and aggregate your video and distribute it through a Taboola-style recommendation model, as well as in-text links (if you’re that way inclined) and sponsored content. In its dashboard, it’ll also match content with interested readers, helping you keep engagement consistent.